Conflict Resolution/Grievance Procedure

Conflict Resolution/Grievance Procedure
I. Purpose
When there is a difference of opinion regarding college
procedures, policies, decisions, values, or treatment, students at
OCCC are encouraged to seek resolution with the individual the
conflict exists with, or his/her supervisor. If the conflict is with a
service area of the College, resolution should first be sought in that
area.
This grievance procedure has been established to provide
individuals or groups of students the opportunity to challenge
decisions and/ or actions taken by faculty, staff, or other students
which they feel are in violation of their rights. Students with a
grievance shall follow the process as outlined below.
II. Grievance Procedure
Grievance issues should be resolved in a timely manner. In order
to assure this, time restrictions are a part of each step. If a student
grievant misses a deadline, the process is considered to be
terminated. If college personnel fail to meet a deadline, the
grievance is forwarded automatically to the President for
resolution. The time lines can be extended by mutual agreement
between the involved parties at any time.

Time lines start when written materials are submitted to the Dean
of Students’ Office. Under Step 2 below, to insure that grievance
materials reach the appropriate office in a timely fashion, students
shall file their grievances with the Dean of Students’ Office. This
office is responsible for noting when the grievance is filed and for
sending copies to the appropriate parties.
Step 1: Informal Grievance Procedures for Conflict Resolution
with Students/Faculty/Staff Members
a. It is recommended that the student discuss the problem with the
faculty, staff member, or student directly involved within ten
(10) calendar days of the event’s occurrence.
b. If the student chooses not to discuss the problem with the other
party, or the problem is not resolved during the discussion, the
student should meet with an advisor for further discussion
and, if desired by the student, to begin formal grievance
procedures.
Step 2: Formal Grievance Procedures
a. If the problem cannot be resolved informally, as described in
Step1 above, the student may file a college Grievance Form.
Grievance Forms are available at OCCC Student Services
counter and all other OCCC centers. These completed forms
must be turned in to the Dean of Students’ Office within seven
(7) working days of meeting with an Advisor. Time lines
commence at the time of the meeting with the Advisor.
b. Within seven (7) working days of receipt of the formal written
grievance form, the Dean of Students will contact all involved
parties and attempt to clarify the complaint and assist the
parties to reach a solution that is mutually acceptable to all
parties. The resolution will be provided in writing to the
involved parties.
c. The Dean of Students shall issue a written decision to all parties
involved within 14 working days of receipt of the student’s
grievance.
Step 3: Appeal of Dean of Students’ Decision
a. If the student does not accept the decision of the Dean of Students,
the student may submit a written appeal to the President within
seven (7) working days of receipt of the decision of theDean of
Students.
1. The student must present all evidence in writing,
including a copy of the original grievance form and
previous decisions in the matter reached at lower levels of
the process.
2. The student must also submit a written statement which
explains why the decision of the Dean of Students was
unsatisfactory, and which thoroughly describes a
specific, requested remedy to the grievance.
b. Within seven (7) working days of receipt of the appeal fromthe
student, the President shall meet with the student regarding the
student’s grievance and:
1. make a summary decision; or
2. remand the issue to the College Appeals Committee.
Step 4: College Appeals Committee
At the President’s discretion, the issues may be remanded to the
College Appeals Committee. The Committee will review thefacts
of the issue and make a recommended decision for thePresident’s
review and approval. The College Appeals Committee shall
consist of the following people: two (2) staff members selected by
the President; two (2) students selected by the Associated Student
Government of OCCC; and two (2) persons representing faculty
designated by the College.
Step 5: Final Decision
At the conclusion of Step 3 or Step 4 above, as determined by the
discretion of the President, the President shall issue a written
decision on the grievance to all parties involved within seven (7)
working days of the meeting with the student. The decision of the
President is final and not subject to further appeal.

Conflict Resolution

Conflict Resolution

JohnBaker

John Baker

Conflict: Identified, clarified and put to positive use.

Long-time Lincoln County business consultant and “Leadership Lincoln” facilitator John Baker leads this two-session course which uses case studies and other materials to delve into how best to resolve conflicts to ensure the smooth operation of your business (or personal life).  Participants will have the opportunity to discover their own conflict profile and be armed with the tools to develop effective strategies to deal with each of the conflict modes. A must-have class for improving interpersonal behavior and relationships.

“If responding in kind is unkind or unproductive,” Baker says, “don’t do it.”

Tues., Oct. 4, 2-5pm • Newport
Tues., Oct. 18, 2-5pm • Lincoln City
Tuition: $35 • Instructor: John Baker
Register here, or call 541-994-4166

Conflict Resolution

Conflict Resolution (Grievance Procedures)

Student Services 835

I. Purpose

When there is a difference of opinion regarding college procedures, policies, decisions, values, or treatment, students at OCCC are encouraged to seek resolution with the individual the conflict exists with, or his/her supervisor. If the conflict is with a service area of the College, resolution should first be sought in that area.

This grievance procedure has been established to provide individuals or groups of students the opportunity to challenge decisions and/or actions taken by faculty, staff, or other students which they feel are in violation of their rights. Students with a grievance shall follow the process as outlined below.

II. Grievance Procedure

Grievance issues should be resolved in a timely manner. In order to assure this, time restrictions are a part of each step. If a student grievant misses a deadline, the process is considered to be terminated. If college personnel fail to meet a deadline, the grievance is forwarded automatically to the President for resolution. The time lines can be extended by mutual agreement between the involved parties at any time. Time lines start when written materials are submitted to the Dean of Students’ Office.

Under Step 2 below, to insure that grievance materials reach the appropriate office in a timely fashion, students shall file their grievances with the Dean of Students’ Office. This office is responsible for noting when the grievance is filed and for sending copies to the appropriate parties.

A. Step 1: Informal Grievance Procedures for Conflict Resolution with Students/Faculty/Staff Members:
  1. It is recommended that the student discuss the problem with the faculty, staff member, or student directly involved within ten (10) calendar days of the event’s occurrence.
  2. If the student chooses not to discuss the problem with the other party, or the problem is not resolved during the discussion, the student should meet with an advisor for further discussion and, if desired by the student, to begin formal grievance procedures.
B. Step 2: Formal Grievance Procedures:
  1. If the problem cannot be resolved informally, as described in Step 1 above, the student may file a college Grievance Form. Grievance Forms are available at OCCC Student Services counter and all other OCCC centers. These completed forms must be turned in to the Dean of Students’ Office within seven (7) working days of meeting with an Advisor. Time lines commence at the time of the meeting with the Advisor.
  2. Within seven (7) working days of receipt of the formal written grievance form, the Dean of Students will contact all involved parties and attempt to clarify the complaint and assist the parties to reach a solution that is mutually acceptable to all parties. The resolution will be provided in writing to the involved parties. The Dean of Students shall issue a written decision to all parties involved within 14 working days of receipt of the student’s grievance.
C. Step 3: Appeal of Dean of Students’ Decision:
  1. If the student does not accept the decision of the Dean of Students, the student may submit a written appeal to the President within seven (7) working days of receipt of the decision of the Dean of Students.
    a. The student must present all evidence in writing, including a copy of the original grievance form and previous decisions in the matter reached at lower levels of the process.
    b. The student must also submit a written statement which explains why the decision of the Dean of Students was unsatisfactory, and which thoroughly describes a specific, requested remedy to the grievance.
  2. Within seven (7) working days of receipt of the appeal from the student, the President shall meet with the student regarding the student’s grievance and:
    a. make a summary decision; or
    b. remand the issue to the College Appeals Committee.
D. Step 4: College Appeals Committee:

At the President’s discretion, the issues may be remanded to the College Appeals Committee. The Committee will review the facts of the issue and make a recommended decision for the President’s review and approval. The College Appeals Committee shall consist of the following people: two (2) staff members selected by the President; two (2) students selected by the Associated Student Government of OCCC; and two (2) persons representing faculty designated by the Council of Curriculum and Instruction.

E. Step 5: Final Decision:

At the conclusion of Step 3 or Step 4 above, as determined by the discretion of the President, the President shall issue a written decision on the grievance to all parties involved within seven (7) working days of the meeting with the student. The decision of the President is final and not subject to further appeal. Copies of OCCC’s Conflict Resolution (Grievance Procedures) Policy 835 are available at Student Services and all centers.

Lincoln City Center Offerings Fall 2018

Drive less. Learn more.

In Fall ’18, OCCC in Lincoln City will host more classes than ever before

MATH • PSYCHOLOGY • BIOLOGY • BUSINESS & MORE!

If you live or work in North Lincoln County and classes at OCCC’s North County Center would be more convenient than in Newport or Waldport, Fall 2018 is the term for you! This Fall, you’ll find a wider variety of classes offered at the North Center than ever before. If you’d like to know more about these courses, or would like to register for Fall courses at any OCCC location, start with a quick meeting with an academic advisor! Already met with an advisor? Click here to begin the registration process.
Questions? Call us at 541-867-8501 or email us!   {Where is the North County Center? It’s at 3788 SE High School Drive in Lincoln City. Click here to map it.}
Here’s the full lineup scheduled for Fall 2018. Act fast, as classes begin September 24 at all OCCC locations.

Arts & Letters

ENG 105 | Introduction to Literature: Drama – 4 Credits

Instructor: Staff
Streamed from off-site location to Lincoln City via two-way videoconference.
Mondays & Wednesdays, 5:30pm-7:20pm
Enhances enjoyment of plays as literature, including tragedies and comedies; increases understanding of the conventions of drama and the theater; and encourages exploration of the diversity of human experience. Prerequisites: WR 115 and RD 115 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

WR 115 | Introduction to Expository Writing – 4 Credits

Instructor: Kai Gaspar
Tuesday & Thursday, 3:30-5:20pm
Introduces college level skills in reading critically, exploring ideas, and writing. Covers composing essays which support a thesis through structure appropriate to both thesis and reader and revision for clarity and correctness. Prerequisites: (Placement into WR 115 or completion of WR 90 or ESOL 262) and (placement into RD 115 or completion of RD 90 or ESOL 260). Audit available.

WR 121 | English Composition I – 4 Credits

Instructor: Kai Gaspar
Tuesday & Thursday, 5:30-7:20pm
Focuses on academic writing as a means of inquiry. Uses critical reading, discussion and the writing process to explore ideas, develop cultural awareness and formulate positions. Emphasizes development of a variety of strategies to present evidence in support of a thesis. Prerequisite: Placement into WR 121, or completion of WR 115 and RD 115. Audit available.

Biology

BIO 142 | Habitats: Marine Biology – 4 Credits

Instructor: Marion Mann
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 12:20-3:20 (Includes Lab)
Examines marine environment and the ecology, physiology, and morphology of marine plants and animals, emphasizing Oregon. Laboratory focuses on identification and environmental testing. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. (See a video from a BIO 142 Field Trip to Boiler Bay.)

Business

The OCCC Business Program is based at the North County Center in Lincoln City. Dr. Alberto Flores heads the department, and is based in Lincoln City. Need more information about the business program and how it might help achieve your goals? Click here to open an information request form to send directly to Dr. Flores.

BA 228 | Computer Accounting Applications (QuickBooks) – 3 Credits

Instructor: Greg Charles
Online Course with mandatory Saturday session, Sept. 29 in Lincoln City.
Introduces double-entry, fully integrated computerized general ledger software. Topics include general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, fixed assets, bank reconciliations, and inventory. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115, and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Recommended: BA 111 or BA 211 and CAS 133. Audit available.

BA 256 | Income Tax – 3 Credits

Instructor: Staff
Monday, 3:30-5:20
Students demonstrate an understanding of the theory and practice of preparing of federal and state individual income tax returns.

BA 211 | Principles of Accounting 1 – 3 Credits

Instructor: Jason Swain
Monday, 5:30-7:20
Introduces financial accounting theory, including the accounting cycle, analysis and recording of transactions, and reporting financial information in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Recommend: MTH 60 and BA 111. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115, and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

CAS 133 | Computer Applications – 4 Credits

Instructor: Tom Boyce
Tuesdays, 5:30-7:50pm
Introduces the basic features of Microsoft Office, Windows basics, and file management. Develops familiarity with Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, email, and Internet basics. Provides an overview of the MyPCC Portal website. Covers components of the Internet and Computing Core (IC3) program content. Recommended: RD 115 and WR 115. Keyboarding by touch recommended. Audit available.

College Skills

CG 100 | College Survival & Success – 3 Credits

Instructor: Steve Carr
Wednesday, 3:30-5:20pm
Provides information and techniques for time, money and self-management, including motivation, goal setting, and accepting personal responsibility for college success. Includes developing skills for navigating a culturally diverse learning environment and utilizing college resources and services. Completion of CG 100 is equivalent to CG 101-102-103. Audit available.

Communications

COMM 228 | Mass Communications & Society – 4 Credits

Instructor: Greg Dewar
Tuesday & Thursday, 3:30-5:20pm
Surveys media of mass communication and the effects on society. Introduces the history, development and technological advances of mass communication systems and their subsequent role in society, public discourse and the individual. Includes an analysis of print and broadcast journalism, advertising, public relations, television, film and new media. Course may be taken one time for credit as J 201 or COMM 228. Prerequisite: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit Available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

History

HST 201 | History of the U.S. to 1840 – 4 Credits

Instructor: Tucker Jackson
Streaming/Hybrid (Lincoln City students join class originating live from Newport via two-way videoconference; Instructor streams live from Lincoln City to Newport on alternating sessions.)
Mondays, 1-3:20pm
Examines the social, political, economic and cultural developments of Colonial America and the Early Republic of the United States. Includes: Native Americans pre- and post- European colonization (Spanish, French, Dutch and English); European indentured servitude and African slavery; Salem Witch Trials; Great Awakening; French and Indian War; Declaration of Independence and the American Revolution; Constitution and the Bill of Rights; Whiskey Rebellion; War of 1812; Missouri Compromise; American Indian Removal. History courses are non-sequential and may be taken in any term and in any order. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

Mathematics

MTH 60 | Introduction to Algebra – 4 Credits

Instructor: Marge Burak
Wednesdays, 1-3:20pm
Introduces algebraic concepts and processes with a focus on linear equations and inequalities in one and two variables. Emphasizes applications, graphs, formulas, and proper mathematical notation throughout the course. A scientific calculator may be required. The TI-30X II is recommended. Recommended that MTH 20 be taken within the past 4 terms. The PCC math department recommends that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms. Prerequisites: MTH 20 and (RD 80 or ESOL 250). Audit available.

MTH 95 | Intermediate Algebra – 4 Credits

Instructor: Lucinda Longo
Mondays & Wednesdays, 8:30am-10:50am
Explores functions graphically, symbolically, verbally, and numerically with an emphasis on function notation. Investigates functions, equations, and graphs involving quadratic, rational, radical, and absolute value expressions. Integrates technology throughout. Recommended that MTH 63 or MTH 65 or MTH 70 be taken within the past 4 terms. The PCC math department recommends that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms. Prerequisites: MTH 63, MTH 65 or MTH 70 and placement into WR 115. Audit available.

MTH 105 | Math in Society – 4 Credits

Instructor: Alison Williams
Streaming/Hybrid (Lincoln City students join class originating live from Newport via two-way videoconference; Instructor streams live from Lincoln City to Newport on alternating sessions.)
Mondays & Wednesdays, 3:30pm-5:20pm
Explores concepts and applications of logic rules, basic probability and statistics as well as personal finance models. Investigates problem solving techniques (algebraic and nonalgebraic) as well as some nontraditional mathematics topics such as social choice or discrete mathematics. Integrates technology where appropriate. The PCC Mathematics Department recommends that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms. Prerequisite: (MTH 95 or MTH 98) and placement into WR 121. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS.

Health & Physical Education

HE 112 | Basic First Aid & Emergency – 1 Credit

Instructor: Staff
Saturday, Sept. 29, 9am-4:50pm
Describes emergency procedures and techniques of basic life support for adult, child, or infant victims of airway obstruction, respiratory arrest and/or cardiac arrest. Provides education and training in Automated External Defibrillator. Upon successful completion of this course, students may earn an American Red Cross Standard First Aid and CPR/AED Adult/Child and Infant CPR certificate or American Health Association equivalent. Recommend: RD 115 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

PE182 | Yoga – 1 Credit

Instructor: Sarah Marquez
Mondays & Wednesdays, 11am-12:20pm
Introduces the values and skills of Hatha Yoga (Yoga of exercise). Includes basic Yoga philosophy and exercises for increased flexibility, improved health, relaxation, and reduced stress in daily living. Audit available. An average class includes asanas (exercises) for the major muscle groups, breathing techniques, balance activities, and skills for stress management. Course includes teacher directed activity, outside class research, planning, and study, films, videotapes, and the practice of relaxation techniques. A Yoga card file and/or Yoga text is recommended to aid student learning and understanding. A completed physician’s exam report is recommended.

Psychology

PSY 101 | Psychology & Human Relations – 4 Credits

Instructor: Rick Laughlin
Streaming/Hybrid (Lincoln City students join class originating live from Newport via two-way videoconference; Instructor streams live from Lincoln City to Newport on alternating sessions.)
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:30am-12:20pm
Applies psychological principles to relationships in both personal and professional environments. Includes an overview of basic personality and social psychology concepts, as well as specific skill development in the areas of communication, listening, and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.
If you’d like to know more about these courses, or would like to register for Fall courses at any OCCC location, start with a quick meeting with an academic advisor! Already met with an advisor? Click here to begin the registration process.  Questions? Call us at 541-867-8501 or email us!  

Complaints, Feedback, and Appeals

Are you concerned about someone’s safety? Did you witness discrimination or harassment? Please report incidents and help keep everyone safe!  Email student.services@oregoncoastcc.org or call 541-867-8501 to make a report.

Are you unhappy with your experience at OCCC? Do you have a special circumstance that needs attention? Do you want to give someone a pat on the back for a job well done? This page describes several options for submitting appeals, raising concerns, filing complaints, and sharing feedback with the college.

Appeals – Financial

Tuition appeal

If you were unable to complete a course due to circumstances beyond your control, you may file a tuition appeal. Please email enrollment.services@oregoncoastcc.org Include a personal statement and documentation of the circumstances that caused you to be unable to complete the course.

Financial Aid appeal

Federal regulations require that all students who receive financial aid must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). You will be notified via your @oregoncoastcc.org email if you no longer meet Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress and you will have the opportunity to submit an appeal.  If you have questions regarding financial aid appeals, please contact finaid@oregoncoastcc.org.

Appeals – Academic

Grade appeal

A Grade Appeal is a process used by a student when they believe they have been subject to improper evaluation This process is used for appealing final course grades only. This process is not to be used to appeal grades for individual assignments or exams. Before submitting a grade appeal, please review OCCC’s Grade Appeal Procedure in the college catalog Grade appeal forms are available from Student Services.

Academic records appeal

If you have experienced a sudden and unexpected circumstances that prevented you from meeting drop, withdrawal, or grading option deadlines, you may appeal for an exception to the deadline or to have your transcript updated. Your appeal must be received by both OCCC and Portland Community College within 90 days from the end of the term. If you are seeking both a tuition refund and a transcript change, please indicate this in your request.

If you are seeking a transcript change only, email enrollment.services@oregoncoastcc.org and pccregistrar@pcc.edu from your PCC email account and include your Name, G#, Term, CRN, Course Number/Title, Explanation, and Requested Action. Documentation of the circumstances must be attached or faxed to 971-722-7135 before the appeal can be reviewed. Notification of the outcome of your appeal will be sent to your MyPCC email address within 30 days of receipt.  If you need assistance with this type of appeal including G#, PCC email, and/or CRN, please contact Enrollment Services at enrollment.services@oregoncoastcc.org.

Academic progress suspension appeal

You may choose to appeal your academic suspension by completing an Appeal for Exception to Academic Suspension. Before submitting your appeal, review the Academic Standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress webpage. Exceptions are only granted when all student procedures and requirements are followed and documentation of extenuating circumstances is provided.  You will be notified via your @oregoncoastcc.org email if you need to submit re-entry form and you will have to appeal academic suspension your academic suspension status.

Classroom climate concern

You may have concerns about the learning environment, quality of instruction, or the educational experience while at OCCC. If so, use the Complaints process (below). Your first step should be to follow the informal resolution process and speak directly with your instructor in an attempt to resolve your concern.

Complaints

Our goal is that students are satisfied with the education and services received at OCCC. If you do have a concern, however, about any aspect of your experience – services received, quality of instruction, interaction with staff – you may follow our complaint process to seek resolution or be heard.

Informal resolution

Your first step should be to try to resolve the issue informally. If your complaint is about an instructor or specific staff member at the college, please contact them directly. You can use the faculty and staff directory to find their contact information. Many issues can be resolved with a simple meeting, phone call, or email.

Formal complaint process

If your attempts to resolve the issue informally have failed, you may submit a formal written complaint to the Dean of Students office. Complaints are reviewed and forwarded to the appropriate college administrator for investigation and response. Submit a formal complaint by emailing Student Services at student.services@oregoncoastcc.org.  Please view the entire Conflict Resolution and Grievance Policy and Process here.

Feedback

Compliments and recognition

We would love to hear that we did well! The best way to compliment or recognize a OCCC faculty or staff member or highlight a positive experience you have had at OCCC is to deliver it directly to the individual. You can use the faculty and staff directory to search for contact information. Feel free to contact Student Services for assistance.

Suggestions

We are always working on improving our services and the student experience. If you have a suggestion for us, please email Student Services at student.services@oregoncoastcc.org.

Course evaluations

Course evaluations are offered to registered students of credit classes taught at OCCC. They are a great place to share information about your experience with a course. Course evaluations collect general feedback about the quality and delivery of classes. Course evaluations are available near the end of the term. All course evaluations are completely confidential and voluntary.

Course Content and Outcome Guide for NUR 243


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Course Number:
NUR 243

Course Title:
Preparation for Entry into Practice

Credit Hours:
8

Lecture Hours:
30

Lecture/Lab Hours:
0

Lab Hours:
150

Special Fee:
none

Course Description

Presents concepts in nursing management and professional nursing issues. Includes a clinical preceptorship within a health care setting.

Intended Outcomes for the Course

  1. Use clinical decision-making, critical thinking skills and evidence based practice in the application of the nursing process for assigned patients.
  2. Communicate effectively and collaboratively with patients, families, their preceptor, and other members of the healthcare team.
  3. Assume responsibility for the “Manager of Care” role; overseeing the patient plan of care for an assigned patients.
  4. Compare and contrast aspects of healthcare systems and their impact on patient outcomes.
  5. Improve quality of care with evidence-based practices, within the scope of nursing.
  6. Use sound judgment and decision-making based upon professional values and established nursing standards of care.
  7. Show readiness for seeking employment as a registered nurse.

Course Activities and Design

  1. Lecture
  2. Skills practice lab with simulation
  3. Clinical practice preceptorship
  4. Clinical post-conference
  5. Reflective journaling
  6. Written Assignments
  7. Professional Issues Project

Outcome Assessment Strategies

  1. Multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions that require integration, application, and critical examination of material covered in class
  2. Formative and summative clinical performance evaluations by RN Preceptor and Instructor
  3. Written assignments designed to stimulate critical thinking related to clinical experiences and readiness for entry into the nursing profession.
  4. Oral presentation resulting from group research, analysis, and critical evaluation.
  5. Written journals designed to promote integration of clinical outcomes with personal reflection on clinical experience.
  6. Completion of drug dose math exam at 90% or above.
  7. ATI comprehensive student assessment program (Practice and proctored exams)

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

  1. Understanding Health Care Delivery Systems: Healthcare economics; organizational theory & structure; Methods of nursing care delivery
  2. Managing Human Resources I: Power; Collective bargaining
  3. Managing Human resources II: Managing stress & conflict resolution; Communication styles with groups & individuals
  4. Understanding Health Care Delivery System
    • Styles of leadership & management; Motivation & performance appraisal.
  5. Knowing Your Practice
    • Delegation in the clinical setting; Legal implications of managing orders
  6. Improving Care Through Quality
    • Evidence based practice
    • Prioritizing patient care
  7. OSBN Licensure and new graduate process

Skills

(in selected situations)

  • Organize and prioritize multiple skills for complex patients with changing health care needs.

Student Consumer Information

On this page you’ll find links to important resources and documentation.
Looking for something you cannot find? Try the search bar (bottom right of the website) or Contact  OCCC’s Enrollment Services Manager/Registrar.

College Information

Accreditation Statement

Faculty & Staff Directory

Student Information

Academic Integrity

Academic Program Requirements (Listed in College Catalog, here)

Complaints, Feedback, and Appeal

Conflict Resolution

Discrimination & Harassment (Refer to Student Handbook P. 19 & 42)

Gender-Based & Sexual Misconduct Policy (Also Listed in College Catalog (P. 29) here)

Harassment (Listed in College Catalog, here)

Copyright Policy

Crime Awareness and Campus Security

Drug & Alcohol Abuse Prevention

Equal Opportunity (Refer to Student Handbook (P. 42) or the College Catalog (P. 9)

FERPA/Student Records Confidentiality 

Financial Aid (See also, Student Handbook (P. 22) or the College Catalog (P. 23)

Gainful Employment

AQS Certificate Program

Medical Assistant Program

Practical Nursing

GED Information

Library Privacy & Confidentiality Policy

Net Price Calculator

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Services for Students with Disabilities

Student Records and FERPA

Student Right to Know

Student Right To Know Act of 1990

Transfer Credit Policy

Requesting Transfer Credits

Transcripts

Veterans Education Benefits (See catalog, p. 25)

Tuition & Fees

Net Price Calculator

Refunds

Voter Registration

Special Dates, Announcements & Observances

Constitution Day

Science Environment and More

Science, Environment,
Economics & Common Ground

From global warming to the local battle about aerial spraying, environmental issues more often divide than unite us. This class uses six hot issues to explore how science and conflict resolution practices can help create mutual understanding and the discovery of common ground. Each class discuss one issue. In the 2nd and following classes each session begins with a short follow up on the previous class. The goal is not to solve these big problems, but to find constructive ways to talk about them and to use the relevant science, economics, and ethics. The issues are: Climate change, global warming, and sea level, endangered species, sound management of land and preservation issues, genetically modified organisms, growth and land use and aerial spraying.

Wallace Kaufman has been published in American Forests, Orion, National Wildlife, and Audubon. He has mediated and facilitated the discussion of land-use conflicts and served as Adviser to the Government of Kazakhstan on Housing and Land Reform.

Central County Campus • Newport
Mondays & Fridays, 12:30-2pm • Oct. 2-20 • $35
Instructor: Wallace Kaufman           
To register, call 541-996-6222 or click here.

Academic Integrity

Honesty in all academic work is an essential element in a learning environment. Attempting to gain unfair academic advantage by cheating or presenting another’s work as one’s own are violations of OCCC’s Guidelines for Student Conduct. The descriptions below outline unacceptable academic conduct that may lead to disciplinary action up to and including expulsion from the college.

Cheating

Cheating is an act defined as presenting examinations, assignments, materials, projects, or other work which was completed, created, and/or assembled from sources or activities forbidden by the faculty. Cheating includes giving information, materials, or work to another person in order to help that person cheat. Cheating is any act in which a student gains unfair academic advantage through duplicity, deception, or dishonesty of any kind.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is an act defined as presenting academic work, term papers, essays, projects, experiments, examinations, or other assignments which are not entirely the student’s work. Plagiarism may include, but is not limited to, quoting sources without giving appropriate credit, building upon the work of another without giving proper credit, taking and presenting as one’s own work actual articles or documents or any portion of actual articles or documents from any source, including print, computer and electronic media, or directly using another person’s ideas or concepts rather than words without crediting the source.

Copyright Violations

Unauthorized use of copyrighted materials from any source, including but not limited to, print and electronic media, is an act of academic dishonesty. Copyright violators are subject to legal penalty. (http://www.oregoncoastcc.org/copyright/).

I. Policy

Learning is built on the fundamental qualities of honesty, fairness, respect and trust. At Oregon Coast Community College, academic integrity is a shared endeavor characterized by truth, personal responsibility, and high academic standards. Any violation of academic integrity devalues the individual and the community as a whole. One important aspect of academic integrity is academic honesty. Violations of academic honesty include:

Plagiarism
Collusion/Inappropriate Assistance
Cheating
Fabrication/Falsification/Alteration
Unauthorized Multiple Submission
Sabotage and Tampering

A student who violates academic honesty will be subject to disciplinary action according to Students Rights and Responsibilities.

II. Definitions

Violations of academic honesty may include:

Plagiarism:

  • presenting someone else’s words, ideas, artistry, product, or data as one’s own;
  • presenting as new and original, an idea or product derived from an existing source;
  • Collusion/Inappropriate Assistance:
  •  helping another commit an act of academic dishonesty
  • knowingly or negligently allowing work to be used by others. It is a violation of Oregon state law to create and offer to sell part or all of an educational assignment to another person (ORS 1.65.114).

Cheating:

  •  an act of deceit, fraud, distortion of truth, or improper use of another person’s effort to obtain an educational advantage;
  •  includes, but is not limited to, unauthorized access to examination materials prior to the examination itself;
  • Fabrication/Falsification/Alteration:
  • intentional misrepresentation, invention, exaggeration, or alteration of information or data, whether written, verbalized, or demonstrated;
  • Unauthorized Multiple Submission:
  • using any work previously submitted for credit without prior instructor permission;
  • Sabotage and Tampering:
  • intentional altering or interfering with documents or other student’s work;
  • intentionally depriving others of academic resources.

III. Procedures of Academic Integrity Inquiry Process

A. Action/Steps by Faculty:

1. The faculty member observing or investigating an apparent violation of academic honesty meets with the student and shares the Oregon Coast Community College Academic Integrity Policy and Procedures. The faculty member explains to the student the procedures and penalties for violation of academic honesty.
2. The faculty member provides the student an opportunity to explain the incident.
3. If, after initial investigation and conference with the student, the faculty member resolves the issue informally with the student and determines that there was no violation of academic honesty, the process is concluded and there is no need to complete the Academic Integrity Concern Form.
4. If, after initial investigation and conference with the student, the faculty member finds that there has been some violation of academic honesty, the violation is documented, using the Academic Integrity Concern Form.
5. The faculty member collects evidence by assembling all relevant documentary evidence and creating a paper trail of all that occurs after the alleged act of academic dishonesty. Often the evidence will include various samples of the student’s work showing a radical disparity in style or ability.
6. If the faculty member finds the student to have been dishonest, the faculty member may resolve the matter by determining an appropriate course of action, which may include an oral or written warning; or a grade of “F” or zero on an assignment, project, or examination; or a lower grade or grade of “F” or “No Pass” for the course. The completed Academic Integrity Concern Form is submitted to the Dean of Students and to the Dean of Academics & Workforce.
7. In the event the faculty member’s investigation is pending at the time course grades are due, the faculty member may elect to submit a mark of “I” (Incomplete), with the student informed in writing by the faculty for the reason for the investigation and the incomplete mark via the Academic Integrity Concern form.

B. Involvement of Dean of Academics & Workforce:

1. If the accused student contests the faculty member’s decision, a meeting with the Dean of Students and the Dean of Academics & Workforce may be requested.
2. If the faculty member wishes to assign a grade of “F” or “No Pass” for the course, or initiate further disciplinary action (e.g., place the student on program-based academic probation), the student is entitled to a meeting with the Dean of Students and the Dean of Academics & Workforce for the purpose of further inquiry into the incident.
3. Within ten (10) working days of receiving the Academic Integrity Concern Form, the Dean of Academics & Workforce coordinates a meeting between all parties regarding the alleged incident of academic dishonesty. Official notification of this meeting should be in writing. The purpose of the meeting is for the student to hear the charges and present his/her side of the case. The Dean of Academics & Workforce will consider any evidence submitted within seven (7) days of the meeting, and interview persons as warranted. The Dean of Academics & Workforce determines if the action recommended by the faculty member is appropriate. If the student misses the meeting, the faculty member and the Dean of Academics & Workforce may proceed with the process to completion.
4. Within five (5) working days of the meeting, the Dean of Academics & Workforce sends written notification of the results of the inquiry to the student, faculty member, and the Dean of Students. The decision of the Dean of Academics & Workforce is final.
5. Further consequences may be imposed by the Dean of Academics & Workforce in cases of grievous violations of academic honesty or for a continued pattern of violations.

C. Grievance Procedure:

See Conflict Resolution (Student Grievance Procedure).

IV. Consequences for Violations of Academic Honesty

A. If a student is found guilty of violating academic honesty, any one or a combination of the following consequences may be imposed by the faculty member:

1. Oral or written disciplinary admonition and warning;
2. Temporary Exclusion from class, lab, clinical not to exceed one class session;
3. A grade of “F” or a zero for the assignment, project, or examination.

B. The following consequences may be imposed by the faculty member after an inquiry conducted by the Dean of Academics & Workforce:

1. Program-based academic probation;
2. A lower grade or a grade of “F” or “No Pass” for the course, overriding a student’s ability to withdraw from the course (in some programs, this may result in a student’s removal from the program).

C. The following consequences may be imposed by the Dean of Academics & Workforce in cases of grievous acts of dishonesty or for a continued pattern of dishonesty:

1. Disciplinary admonition and warning;
2. Disciplinary probation with or without the loss of privileges for a definite period of time. The violation of the terms of the disciplinary probation or the breaking of any college rule during the probation period may be grounds for suspension or expulsion from the college;
3. Suspension from Oregon Coast Community College for a definite period of time;
4. Expulsion from Oregon Coast Community College.

Contents of this policy and procedure were reviewed and Approved by Council of Curriculum and Instruction: May 12, 2004.

Psychology Course Descriptions

Scheduling requirements and limited resources prevent all courses from being offered every term or every year.  Some courses may be offered exclusively via distance delivery. Course numbers, titles, course and program applicability, prerequisites, instructional format, delivery methods, and content may change without notice.  Students are advised to consult with an advising specialist each term to select courses, create and maintain personal educational plans, and obtain the most current information.

PSY 101
Psychology and Human Relations — 4 Credits

Applies psychological principles to relationships in both personal and professional environments. Includes an overview of basic personality and social psychology concepts, as well as specific skill
development in the areas of communication, listening, and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills
the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 201A
Introduction to Psychology ­ Part 1 — 4 Credits

Surveys the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in scientific research, biological psychology, sensation and perception, learning theory, memory,
language, cognition, consciousness, and human development. Provides an overview of popular trends, examines the overarching themes of heredity vs. environment, stability vs. change, and free will vs. determinism, and emphasizes the sociocultural approach which assumes that gender, culture, and ethnicity are essential to understanding behavior, thought, and emotion. Psychology 201A is the first term of a two­-term sequence in introductory psychology. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 202A
Introduction to Psychology ­ Part 2 — 4 Credits

Surveys the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in personality theory, psychological disorders, therapy, emotion, motivation, intelligence, health
psychology, and social psychology. Provides an overview of popular trends, examines the overarching themes of heredity vs. environment, stability vs. change, and free will vs. determinism, and
emphasizes the sociocultural approach which assumes that gender, culture, and ethnicity are essential to understanding behavior, thought, and emotion. Psychology 202A is the second term of a
two ­term sequence in introductory psychology. Recommended: PSY 201 or PSY 201A. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 213
Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience — 4 Credits

Surveys the role of the brain and nervous system in behavior, psychological functioning, and neurophysiological processes that underlie human development. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115
and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores, and PSY 201A or one year of biology.Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social
Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 214
Introduction to Personality — 4 Credits

Covers a variety of personality theories including the theoretical and scientific explanations for individuals’ characteristic patterns of perception, thought, emotion and behavior. Emphasizes the
understanding and mastery of personality constructs applied to students’ personal and professional lives. Recommended: PSY 201A or PSY 202A. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or
equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social
Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 215
Human Development — 4 Credits

Surveys major developmental theories and patterns of change and continuity from birth to death in human subjects. Emphasizes biological, cognitive, and emotional development through the lifespan. Examines cultural influences on development. Recommended: PSY 201A or PSY 202A. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 216
Social Psychology — 4 Credits

Surveys the scientific study of how individuals think about, influence, and relate to one another with respect to social beliefs, persuasion, attraction, conformity, obedience, prejudice, aggression, and pro-­social behaviors. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent  placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 222
Family & Intimate Relationships — 4 Credits

Explores processes involved in both traditional and non­traditional relationships and families: including love, cohabitation, dating, marriage, parenting, communication and conflict resolution,
sexuality, balancing work and family, domestic violence, divorce, remarriage, and blended families. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115, and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 231
Human Sexuality — 4 Credits

Explores sexual issues from scientific and humanistic perspectives. Surveys historical, cultural and cross-cultural variation in sexuality, sex research, female and male sexual and reproductive
anatomy and physiology, gender issues, sexual response, sexual communication, sexual behavior patterns, love, and sexual orientations. This is the first course in a two ­course sequence.
Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 232
Human Sexuality — 4 Credits

Explores sexual issues from scientific and humanistic perspectives. Surveys sexuality through the life cycle, sexual problems, sexual satisfaction, contraception, conception, sexuality and disability, sex and chronic illness, sexually transmitted infections, sexual victimization, atypical sexual behavior, and the commercialization of sex. This is the second course in a two course sequence. Recommended: PSY 231 taken before PSY 232. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 236
Psychology of Adult Development and Aging — 4 Credits

Provides an overview of the biological, cognitive, and psycho-social aspects of adulthood and aging including theories of aging and specific research in the field of gerontology. Focuses on genetic
and environmental factors that influence health as we age. Includes the challenges specific to gender, ability level, and culture. Recommended: PSY201 or PSY 201A or PSY 215. Prerequisites:
WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores.Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS,Social Sciences/ASOT­B.

PSY 239
Introduction to Abnormal Psychology — 4 Credits

Surveys the history, theories, etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of the spectrum of psychological disorders. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test
scores, and PSY 201 or PSY 201A or PSY 202 or PSY 202A. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT­B.